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How to Upgrade Store Bought Mustard, and make it your own.

Welcome to Our Sunday Café, we are pleased you stopped by for a visit. Today we are offering another delicious recipe from our kitchen. We hope you enjoy it as much as we did…


This photo almost looks black and white, but it is not. This is a shot out the front door. The ivy growing under the fir trees has about 2 inches of snow covering it. The rest of the yard has almost 4 inches. The wind has now come up and snow is blowing about, making it difficult to see more than 3 feet in front of your path.

We are in the house, warm, full of soup and letting the night fall. It is early to think that, but I am in for the night. There are cookies to bake, and music to enjoy.

I did get the conserve completed, and the canning kettle put away. There is molasses cookie dough chilling, ready to roll into balls and bake. The fudge is set, cut and ready to package. The noodles are dry, ready to package.

I got all of my old spice jars washed and ready to fill. I also got some flavored mustard ready. These flavors are delicious and make great last minute gifts.

Dressed Up Mustard
by the seat of my pants

I took a jar of Plockmans premium stone ground mustard (30.5oz) and in 1/2 of the mustard I added:
zest of 1 lime
1-2 T lime juice
3 T honey
1 T white balsamic vinegar
2 T sugar
1 T ground coriander

to the rest of the jar I added:
2 c dried cranberries
2 T white cooking wine
3 T honey
combine in food processor until mixed and the cranberries are chopped finely but not pureed.

I love flavored mustard, plus they keep practically forever and are great to spice up different foods and in your cooking.

Tomorrow I am going to assemble the Holiday Gift Baskets, they will keep nicely until Christmas in the garage where it is cold.

All that is left now is the stocking stuffers, there is always tomorrow!

Enjoy!

Thank you for visiting Our Sunday Cafe, as always we appreciate your time when you visit and your wonderful comments! 

If you like what you see here, we would appreciate it if you told your friends (we would love more followers!), if not, tell us. Our goal is to share relevant information that you will use and enjoy. 

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PS, you may also enjoy our Homemade Household page, it can be found right at the top of the blog!



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A Simple and Delicious Dry Rub for Meat

Welcome to Our Sunday Café, we are pleased you stopped by for a visit. Today we are offering another delicious recipe from our kitchen. We hope you enjoy it as much as we did…

A Simple and Delicious Dry Rub for Meats.
A Simple and Delicious Dry Rub for Meats
I wanted to make more dry rub to have on hand to use as well as put into jars for stocking stuffers, or little thank you gifts. I came up with this rub last summer. We used it up actually and I had to make more, it is great.

I had read many, many recipes for dry rubs. Each of them had great reviews, and seemed great. However I kept coming back to the same thought, with so much heavy flavor from herbs and heat from dried chilies; how could you taste the meat?

So I came up with my own...............

Simple and Delicious Dry Rub for Meats
by the seat of my pants
makes about 1/2 c
1/c c Paula Deen house salt*
2 T brown sugar
1/2 t chili powder
1/2 t dry mustard
1 T paprika
dash cayenne
1/2 t oregano
1/2 t basil
1/2 thyme

Grind your dry herbs in a pestle, combine all ingredients and mix well. Store in labeled bags in a cool dry place.
I made double recipes, in order to have some for gifting. I also made a batch with smoked paprika to spice things up.

* Paula Deen House Salt
1 c salt
1/4 c pepper
1/4 c granulated garlic
Combine and store in a cool dry area.

Enjoy!

Thank you for visiting Our Sunday Cafe, as always we appreciate your time when you visit and your wonderful comments! 

If you like what you see here, we would appreciate it if you told your friends (we would love more followers!), if not, tell us. Our goal is to share relevant information that you will use and enjoy. 


And now, it is very easy to sign up for
Our Sunday Cafe posts by email. You will find the form located in the left sidebar, thank you for subscribing!
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Rose Hip Jelly

Welcome to Our Sunday Café, we are pleased you stopped by for a visit. Today we are offering another delicious recipe from our kitchen. We hope you enjoy it as much as we did…

This was an interesting and fun experiment. I like making something from not much. I think this qualifies. The recipe notes indicated that this would look like jars of honey, once processed.

The first step was to harvest the hips from the roses. I noticed as I was snipping away, that there were not that many. I was able to gather the required 2 cups. I have no information about the roses on the side of my home, they were planted by the previous owners. But I do know that they have been treated in an organic method, since my purchasing the house.

I dumped them into a 2 cup measure to see how close I was in my guess. I could of used a few more, but hey; it is an experiment. The blossom end of the hip was snapped off. The hips were washed and the soft and dark part of the blossom end was pared away. Another wash and then ready to be cut.

I chopped the hips, cut 2 apples into large pieces, added 2 1/2 c water and 1/2 c Chardonnay. Brought it to a boil, and then let is simmer 1 hour.

Here is my strained liquid. I looks a lot like chicken stock!

For the jelly,

The strained liquid, it measured 2 1/2 cups
dash of salt
juice of 1/2 lemon
5 c sugar
1 package of pectin

I brought it to a boil, then boiled rapidly for 7 minutes. There was not enough foam on top to worry about, so no skimming was necessary. I ladled it into 5 half pint jars, and put the small amount left over into a small dish to eat up now. Secured the lids and bands and gave it a 10 minute water bath.

Notes: I would think that the red hips that I have seen in picture after picture, would have more flavor, as well as offer a natural pink color.  I also think you would need a lot more hips to simmer in the liquid, so that the strained liquid would have more flavor.

And here is the finished batch..........

Rose Hip Jelly, from organic roses.
Rose Hip Jelly
It looks like honey, just like the recipe stated it would.

Enjoy!

Thank you for visiting Our Sunday Cafe, as always we appreciate your time when you visit and your wonderful comments! 

If you like what you see here, we would appreciate it if you told your friends (we would love more followers!), if not, tell us. Our goal is to share relevant information that you will use and enjoy. 


And now, it is very easy to sign up for
Our Sunday Cafe posts by email. You will find the form located in the left sidebar, thank you for subscribing!


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Tuna and noodles, a delicious casserole, nothing more to say


Welcome to Our Sunday Café, we are pleased you stopped by for a visit. Today we are offering another delicious recipe from our kitchen. We hope you enjoy it as much as we did…

Tuna and Noodles Casserole, too good to miss!
Tuna and Noodles Casserole, too good to pass up!
How does one describe a tuna casserole without losing the listener? There is a certain automatic sense of dread when someone says tuna casserole, even with me, and I know about this one.

And this one is delicious.

I originally found the recipe in Sunset magazine, years and years ago. Like most recipes, you make it your own.

Delicious Tuna Casserole
350 degrees

1 recipe Puffy Cheese Noodles (remember you can make these ahead and store in the freezer)  
OR 2 c elbow macaroni cooked.
1 c frozen peas
1 can cream of mushroom soup
1/2 can milk
1 T olive oil
1 clove garlic minced
2 t dill weed, crumbled
2 T sherry wine
1 or 2 cans of albacore, drained and broken apart not flaked
1/4 c panko or dry bread crumbs
1/4 c Parmesan cheese

Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add the noodles and boil uncovered 9 - 10 minutes. Add peas and cook an additional minute. Drain well, and set aside.

Saute the garlic in the olive oil until soften but not brown. Add remaining ingredients. Simmer 3 - 4 minutes. Combine the noodles and sauce in a small casserole dish.

Stir together the panko and cheese. Sprinkle evenly over the top. Bake 15 minutes.

Serves 3 -4

Enjoy!

Thank you for visiting Our Sunday Cafe, as always we appreciate your time when you visit and your wonderful comments! 

If you like what you see here, we would appreciate it if you told your friends (we would love more followers!), if not, tell us. Our goal is to share relevant information that you will use and enjoy. 


And now, it is very easy to sign up for
Our Sunday Cafe posts by email. You will find the form located in the left sidebar, thank you for subscribing!

This post is being shared with:

The 12 days of Bloggie-mas @ a moderate life


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Peppers for Cold Meats, from Auguste Escoffer

Welcome to Our Sunday Café, we are pleased you stopped by for a visit. Today we are offering another delicious recipe from our kitchen. We hope you enjoy it as much as we did…

Tonight I came home and had 3 beautiful peppers in the fruit bowl on the dining room table. This recipe came to mind and the results are so delicious. Plus the keeping factor of this relish is wonderful, a true gem hidden in the refrigerator. This is practically mandatory for those times when you have a lovely turkey or ham, for sandwiches.

Peppers for Cold Meats
adapted from The Wednesday Chef
makes about 3 pints, refrigerate to store

4 T olive oil (I used about 2 T)
1 medium onion ( I used 1/2 of a large onion and diced it smallish)
1 pound red sweet peppers (my 3 weighed 1 pound)
1/2 t ground ginger
1/4 t allspice
1/4 t nutmeg
1 pound of tomatoes, blanched diced and drained (I used a 16 oz can, well drained)
1 clove garlic, minced
1/2 c raisins
2/3 c red wine vinegar








Assemble your ingredients.










Soften the diced onion in the olive oil, do not let it brown.

Dice the peppers, add to the onions along with spices. Warm the mixture gently.









Add remaining ingredients, bring to a simmer.
Cover and let (barely) simmer 1 hour and 15 minutes.
Remove lid and simmer 10 - 15 minutes more.
That's it.
Refrigerate until serving.







The raisins will be plump and the taste of the spices will be a part of each bite.

Peppers for Cold Meats, from Auguste Escoffer
Peppers for Cold Meats
Because of the high vinegar level, this will keep a long time. My guess is that it will be gone before you know it!

Enjoy!

Thank you for visiting Our Sunday Cafe, as always we appreciate your time when you visit and your wonderful comments! 

If you like what you see here, we would appreciate it if you told your friends (we would love more followers!), if not, tell us. Our goal is to share relevant information that you will use and enjoy. 


And now, it is very easy to sign up for
Our Sunday Cafe posts by email. You will find the form located in the left sidebar, thank you for subscribing!
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The red apron


I have always been a "get in and get it done" sort of person. If my clothes get dirty along the way, so be it. I will simply put on another (cleaner) pair of jeans and another shirt. Run a comb through my hair and away we go.

Aprons always seemed like a nice thing, but I never remembered to put one on. After a few years (like 30 or so) I no longer had aprons, having given them away. Until Christmas. My Daughter made me a red apron for Christmas. It is beautiful, and is red and a gift from her. It has a permanent home, folded neatly next to the kitchen Aid mixer. A couple of weeks ago, my daughter asked me if I used the apron. I had to confess, no. She remarked that no one, she had made aprons for at Christmas; used their gift.

At the time, I did not feel bad, simply a bit sad. Sad that I had not even tried the apron, simply folded it and placed it neatly in the kitchen, much like a decoration.

As a child I had been taught that something "too pretty to use everyday" was saved. And the red apron, is certainly that. Too pretty to use everyday.

Saved for what I do not know, and "it" was never ever explained.

Certainly not saved for a rainy day, we have hundreds of them here in Vancouver. Certainly not for a dinner party, I really don't have parties. I have "company" and when company comes, it is my responsibility (and pleasure) to make them comfortable. An apron is not required for that.

This morning I threw a pan of apple rolls into the oven, and before I began; I reached for the apron. I slipped it over my head and began working. It felt comfortable, much like my daughter herself. I completed the pan of dough and placed it into the oven to bake, and knew instantly what I would blog about this morning. My daughters apron.

She is a fighter. A quiet, strong fighter. She is tall and beautiful and dedicated. She is fearless. She is accomplished, always willing to try. She makes me proud.

She will be 30 on her next birthday. I had a long labor with her, 30 hours actually. Our running joke had been she "owed" me a year for each hour. She knows it is a joke, but I have gotten many a cup of coffee delivered to me, using that as a ploy! But really I owe her, and my Son for the love they taught me how to grow.

No recipe tops this!

Enjoy your day,

key words:  daughters, aprons, homemade gifts, family
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Pickled Franks!

Welcome to Our Sunday Café, we are pleased you stopped by for a visit. Today we are offering another delicious recipe from our kitchen. We hope you enjoy it as much as we did…

My Father was a hearty eater. He was a tall and big man and it took a lot of food to fill him up! He was adventurous as well, as a family we had interesting things on our table. I was not as adventurous as He, and did not see the value of eating frogs legs or squid or calves brains with scrambled eggs. But the experience taught me the value of seeking out foods to enjoy.

My Mother canned and made jam. She baked bread sometimes, and was a good baker. With 5 children and a hungry husband, she cooked a lot! I believe She wanted to be more creative, yet the amount of food needed to be cooked, took up a lot of time and there was not much left for creativity. But cakes were always frosted and cookies presented on a plate. I came to believe that is how you cook, and that is what you do for your family.

When I married and was new a making a home for my husband and family, I followed the ways that I had been shown. I found that I enjoyed many of the things that my Mother had taught me and I would like to believe that I have passed the best of those on to my children.

This recipe is something my Father would make, leave to "age" and enjoy later. He was a fan of pickled meats and these are tasty as well as, at the ready.

My Dad's garlic pickled franks

1 pkg good quality franks
1 c water
1/2 c vinegar
1 clove garlic, mashed
1 bay leaf

Cut franks diagonally into 2 inch chunks, place in a quart jar, shake lightly to settle the franks into place.

Bring remaining ingredients to a boil, carefully pour over franks, let cool on counter until warm, cover with a lid and set into the fridge to "age".

To serve, remove frank pieces with a wooden spoon and dry gently with a towel. Eat as is or serve with cheese and vegetables as part of a snack tray.

Enjoy!

Thank you for visiting Our Sunday Cafe, as always we appreciate your time when you visit and your wonderful comments! 

If you like what you see here, we would appreciate it if you told your friends (we would love more followers!), if not, tell us. Our goal is to share relevant information that you will use and enjoy. 


And now, it is very easy to sign up for
Our Sunday Cafe posts by email. You will find the form located in the left sidebar, thank you for subscribing!
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