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Make a Christmas Stocking from felted wool sweater - part 2

Welcome to Our Sunday Café, we are pleased you stopped by for a visit. Today we are offering another frugal and worthy project from our home to yours. Today I have another project that is a little different for us to offer, but I think you will like it...

This seems to be where we left off,

This is the first time I have worked with felted wool. With that said, here is something I learned.

If you wish to add a design with embroidery thread or buttons, do that before you sew the front to the back. The felted material is too thick to work comfortably from inside the sock. The decision was made to  change the decoration from a Christmas tree made from buttons to something else. The something else turned out to be a patch pocket, made from a piece of the sweater cuff.

But lets start with a loop.

Using a paper core, loop the embroidery thread around 3 to 4 times.

To strengthen the loop, work a blanket stitch around the loop.

To make a pocket, cut a piece of the cuff, position and whip stitch around the edge. The flat top shank buttons will be used to form a name (thank you sharpie!). It is easier for me to sew the top button, then the bottom button and then add the middle buttons using the already placed buttons for guidance.


Finish the top edge in a blanket stitch. Add the name to the button tops and fill the little pocket. This will be handy for a love note, candy, a little cash or a gift card.......

Since this stocking is for my husband Terry, I made it a bit on the masculine side. And now I need to start one for me.

You can find Christmas Stocking from felted wool sweater - part 1 here

Thank you for visiting Our Sunday Cafe, as always we appreciate your time when you visit and your wonderful comments! 

If you like what you see here, we would appreciate it if you told your friends (we would love more followers!), if not, tell us. Our goal is to share relevant information that you will use and enjoy. 

And now, it is very easy to sign up for
Our Sunday Cafe posts by email. You will find the form located in the left sidebar, thank you for subscribing!

PS, you may also enjoy our Homemade Household page, it can be found right at the top of the blog!


1

Roasted Garlic, the easy way

Welcome to Our Sunday Café, we are pleased you stopped by for a visit. Today we are offering another delicious recipe from our kitchen. We hope you enjoy it as much as we did…

Once upon a time I had a cute terra cotta garlic roaster. It held one head of garlic. It was one of the many  kitchenware items that I owned, "needed" but did not use. Why? Well basically because it did only hold one head of garlic and you know the frugal side of me, was not going to heat up an oven to roast one head of garlic.

Enter the muffin pan. You can load up your pan with 6 heads of garlic, plus they stay upright. Obviously if you need more than six heads of roasted garlic, grab a 12 cup pan. Roasted garlic is a delicious way to eat more garlic, which is very good for us.

Easy Roasted Garlic, muffin tin madness!
Easy Roasted Garlic

Roasted Garlic the easy way
adapted from Pinterest
350 degree oven

1 muffin pan
1 head of garlic for each "cup"
olive oil

Slice the point off to expose the tips of the garlic cloves. Place each each in a separate "cup".


Drizzle with olive oil. Cover with foil, roast for 45-55 minutes. Or until soft and lightly brown in your oven.


Let cool and enjoy!

To use the cloves, when cool enough to handle, carefully break the head apart to separate the  cloves. When ready to use squeeze the roasted garlic out from the papery skin.

Warm roasted garlic is delicious "spread" on bread instead of butter.

You can also coarsely chop the (removed from the papery skin) garlic and toss it with hot pasta, additional olive oil and dry bread crumbs. Pass Parmesan cheese at the table for each to use.

Mash some cloves into soft butter, spread on cut bread, broil Heavenly!

I think you get the idea, it is really easy to enjoy roasted garlic, so get roasting already!

Enjoy!

Thank you for visiting Our Sunday Cafe, as always we appreciate your time when you visit and your wonderful comments! 

If you like what you see here, we would appreciate it if you told your friends (we would love more followers!), if not, tell us. Our goal is to share relevant information that you will use and enjoy. 


And now, it is very easy to sign up for
Our Sunday Cafe posts by email. You will find the form located in the left sidebar, thank you for subscribing!
3

Easiest Cinnamon Rolls Ever! Recipe rewind because some things are too good to miss!


Recipe rewind, because in the beginning there is a blogger who has no readers. She still posts great food in hopes that the readers will come..........you can also view it here in the archives, Sunday June 13, 2010.


Simple things are usually the best.....like these delicious Cinnamon rolls for Sunday June 20th.


Now you might be asking why would someone would make a pan of Cinnamon rolls for Sunday June 20th? Well it also happens to be Father's Day, and I have yet to meet a Dad that did not like Cinnamon Rolls. The thing is though, you might want to get your skill down with a "practice" pan. That way you will have a really good idea of just what a great gift you can make for Dad. However I need to be honest; you don't really need practice, because these rolls are easy.

But a practice pan this weekend, would sure be a plausible excuse to make some now and next weekend too! You can also make the recipe through the final rise, cover and refrigerate overnight and bake fresh for breakfast the next day. Yeast doughs are usually very agreeable to an overnight rest in the fridge.

The process and ingredient list does look involved, but (please) do not let that sway you in your decision to make these Cinnamon rolls. I assure you, the ingredients are everyday, the steps are easy and the rolls are delicious. 

Easy Peasy Cinnamon Rolls for Dad and Everyone
adapted from Yakima Herald Republic Newspaper - Yakima WA
currently in my little black binder,on a very splattered page
makes a 9X13 pan of rolls

Dough
1 c milk, heated to very hot, but not boiling
1/4 c butter, sliced into pats
1/4 c sugar
1 t salt

Place butter, sugar and salt in a large glass bowl, pour hot milk over let sit until warm to the touch. The hot milk will melt the butter and warm the bowl. Prepare yeast mixture.


1 package yeast (2 1/2 t)
1/4 c warm water
pinch of sugar
Combine and let yeast activate or bloom. 



To make the dough, you will need:
up to 41/2 cups of flour, measure out the full measure of flour and dip from that, do not use more.  
1 egg 

When the milk mixture has cooled to warm, stir in about 1/3 of the flour, beat well (11/2-2 minutes with a hand held electric mixer is a good measure, you will develop enough gluten for a well textured and yet tender roll).



Add the egg, stir well.



Add another portion of the flour, beat until smooth (another minute works well).

Stir in the yeast mixture, and beat until smooth.

Add enough (or all) remaining flour or enough to make a soft dough - do not exceed the original 41/2 cups.
Mix well, dough may appear lumpy.


Do not worry.
No kneading required, you could not knead this dough. It is very soft and will produce a soft roll.



Cover bowl and set aside in a warm place to rise, rising time may be 1 - 2 hours depending upon how warm your kitchen is.

When doubled, deflate dough and turn out onto a lightly floured surface.

For rolling/patting out the dough, you will need approximately 1/2 c flour.

 I prefer using a jelly roll style pan to keep the boundaries, both in terms of clean up and size of the patted/rolled out dough.

 You will need to use about 1/3 c flour on the pan, then sprinkle about 2 T flour over top of the dough. 
Important to remember:  This is a very soft dough, you will need to simply proceed with the directions, knowing that all will turn out as promised.


Turn the dough over in a tossing gesture, to gently coat with flour. Roll/pat dough out into a flat rectangle 
about 1/2 inch thick.

Spread with the filling, to within 1 inch of the perimeter of the dough. You will want the outside edges free from the filling, so that you can keep the filling in the dough together before cutting.

Filling
3 T melted butter
6 T sugar
3 t cinnamon
3 T brown sugar
Combine to make a spreadable paste.

Starting on the long side, roll up the dough.

 
Cut the rolled up dough into 12 equal pieces.

 I prefer to work in sections, I divide into four sections, then cut 3 rolls from each section.

Because the dough is soft, it may not keep a pretty shape, again do not worry. Simply proceed to cut each section and place the dough rolls into the pan.


Place in a prepared 9X13 pan. Cover again and let rise until doubled, 45 - 60 minutes.



Bake at 350 degrees for 25-35 minutes, until golden brown. Let cool. Glaze if desired.



Glaze
1/2 c powdered sugar
1 1/2 t milk
1/4 t vanilla
1 t butter
Beat until smooth, spread lightly over cooled rolls.

Enjoy!!

As always, thanks for taking a moment to stop and say hello. We appreciate your time and your wonderful comments!
2

Make a Christmas Stocking from felted wool sweater - part 1

Welcome to Our Sunday Café, we are pleased you stopped by for a visit. Today we are offering another frugal and worthy project from our home to yours. Today I have another project that is a little different for us to offer, but I think you will like it...

One of my fun things to do is shop thrift stores. I do this for amusement and to find the unexpected treasure. But usually I shop for fun and to find raw materials. Now you might be asking what exactly is raw in a thrift store. For me raw materials are goods that can be used for other purposes.

Always always always I search out cookbooks and kitchen goods. You just can't have too many kitchen goods to play with, especially a specialty pan that you did not want to pay full retail for.

But today I will share my second favorite, wool sweaters. They are harder and harder to find, but when I do, I felt them in a (very) hot water wash. The old jokes about the sweater fitting before it was washed, are actually true, if you used hot water. The fun thing about the wool sweaters is that usually the designs are masculine and therefore make a wonderful Christmas stocking for that special man in you life.

It is easy, come and take a look...........

1. Find a wool sweater: I always check the label if I am unsure. Some of the new acrylics have a wool feel to them and of course will not "felt" in hot water.

2. Wash the sweater, use the hot water setting on your washer.

3. Dry the sweater, again use the hottest setting on your dryer.

You should now have a sweater that has a thick felt quality to it, like this one.........

4. Grab a sock and simply cut around it in an exaggerated pattern.

You do want this on the large side, after all it will hold wrapped goodies on Christmas morning. The remainder of the sweater will not go to waste, there are always things to do with thick durable fabric.


5. Stitch a blanket stitch around the outside of the cut out sock. I used a 1/4 inch depth to the stitch. And I chose to run a blanket stitch around the perimeter twice for strength. I am using black (heavy duty) button thread.


Next we will decorate and add a hanging loop,



but that will be part 2.

Thank you for visiting Our Sunday Cafe, as always we appreciate your time when you visit and your wonderful comments! 

If you like what you see here, we would appreciate it if you told your friends (we would love more followers!), if not, tell us. Our goal is to share relevant information that you will use and enjoy. 

And now, it is very easy to sign up for
Our Sunday Cafe posts by email. You will find the form located in the left sidebar, thank you for subscribing!

PS, you may also enjoy our Homemade Household page, it can be found right at the top of the blog!



1

Clams in Chorizo Broth

Welcome to Our Sunday Café, we are pleased you stopped by for a visit. Today we are offering another delicious recipe from our kitchen. We hope you enjoy it as much as we did…

Clams in Chorizo Broth
Clams in Chorizo Broth

Clams in Chorizo Broth
adapted from: The Phoney Gourmets
Serves 4-6

1/4 pound bulk Chorizo ( or 2 small links, remove sausage from casing)
1 T olive oil
1-2 cloves garlic, minced
2 c rich beef stock
salt to taste

2-2 1/2 pounds clams, scrubbed well

Saute Chorizo and garlic in the olive oil. Drain excess fat. Add beef stock, bring to a boil, cover and simmer for 12-20 minutes to cook sausage completely. Taste for salt, bring back to a boil, add clams and boil for 5 minutes or until clams open.

Serve in small bowls with crusty bread for dipping!

Enjoy!

Thank you for visiting Our Sunday Cafe, as always we appreciate your time when you visit and your wonderful comments! 

If you like what you see here, we would appreciate it if you told your friends (we would love more followers!), if not, tell us. Our goal is to share relevant information that you will use and enjoy. 


And now, it is very easy to sign up for
Our Sunday Cafe posts by email. You will find the form located in the left sidebar, thank you for subscribing!

this post is shared with:

Hearth and Soul @ Premeditated Leftovers

Weekend Cooking @ Beth Fish Reads

food on friday @ carol's chatter

3

Pineapple Raisin Sauce for Ham, Recipe rewind because some things are too good to miss!


Recipe rewind, because in the beginning there is a blogger who has no readers. She still posts great food in hopes that the readers will come..........you can also view it here in the archives, Friday December 3, 2010.



It is funny how you will remember, a food memory, from many years gone by. In thinking to myself how I might “market” the December 2010 Culinary Smackdown, without pestering every blogger I know into smithereens, I remembered a sauce my Mom use to make to serve with ham, because it had raisins. I also remember that most of it would be eaten at dinnertime, and only a spoonful was leftover. I usually ate that last little bit, so I could wash the dish.  


Turkey was for Thanksgiving, always. I remember having turkey at Christmas, but I believe that only happened a couple times. Once we had goose, stuffed with apples, prunes and onion quarters. Usually though roast beef was Christmas dinner, roast beef and Yorkshire pudding. As much as I love Thanksgiving, two holiday turkey dinners in a row is too much turkey. I have been making a roast beef dinner for years now, and this year we will be having beef and ham. Ham because my new employer generously gives a turkey at Thanksgiving and a ham at Christmas. And we all know, ham needs Pineapple Raisin Sauce!


When I first started worrying that no one would submit an entry for the Smackdown, I remembered that pineapple raisin sauce. I remembered it because of the raisins, not because I can also be an excessive worrier! Like many of the foods cooked and served, Mom did not use a recipe for the sauce. I remember the sauce so vividly; I think I can recreate it in my own kitchen. I know it started with a can of crushed pineapple, including the juice. Then a big handful of raisins, some brown sugar, a bit of cider vinegar. 


The raisins were tender, not chewy. I also remembered that part. Oh and I remember a dash of cloves. I can see the little red and white tin in her hand, then a quick downward shake to get that “dash” to come out of the can. With exception to the raisins, I imagine that the order per say, does not matter.

A quick google for pineapple raisin sauce for ham produces 60,700 results. I was surprised at that number. It appears that a lot of folks eat pineapple raisin sauce with their ham.


(my mom) Mary’s Pineapple Raisin Sauce for Ham

1 c raisins
1 c water
dash salt

1 8 oz can crushed pineapple – do not drain
1 T cider vinegar
1/3  – 1/2 c brown sugar ( if you like a sweeter sauce, use the full measure)
dash cloves

1/4 c water
1 - 2 T corn starch ( I remember Mom’s sauce would stay on your ham!)

Place raisins and water in a medium size saucepan, cover. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer 10 minutes.

Add the pineapple, vinegar, brown sugar and cloves, return to a simmer. Let simmer while making the slurry.

Combine the cornstarch and water, stirring until smooth. Pour into the simmering fruit in a thin stream, stirring continuously. Cook, until mixture is thickened and transparent. Serve with ham.

As always, thanks for taking a moment to stop and say hello.


I appreciate your time and your wonderful comments!
2

Roasted Beets, Blue Cheese and Walnut Salad over mixed greens.

Welcome to Our Sunday Café, we are pleased you stopped by for a visit. Today we are offering another delicious recipe from our kitchen. We hope you enjoy it as much as we did…

Roasted Beets and Blue Cheese over Mixed Greens
Roasted Beet and Blue Cheese over Mixed Greens

Roasted Beet Blue Cheese Over Mixed Greens
by the seat of my pants!
serves 2-4

4-6 medium beets
1/4-1/2 c blue cheese crumbles
1/4-1/2 c toasted broken walnuts - if desired
4-6 c mixed greens
vinaigrette of choice, this one would be delicious!

Place beets in a baking dish, roast at 350 degrees for 1-1 1/4 hours or until pierced easily with the tip of a knife.

Note: ( I am amazed at how long beets take to cook up tender, but this is so worth the time needed. Plus you can complete other jobs while the beets bake unattended.)

Set aside and let cool. Remove the skin, this is easily done by pushing gently against the beet until the skin begins to "slip". Slice and set aside.

To assemble the salad:
Toss the salad greens with vinaigrette, layer in the bottom of a shallow serving dish.
Toss beet slices with additional vinaigrette, layer over salad greens.
Add blue cheese and finally top with walnuts.

Enjoy!

Thank you for visiting Our Sunday Cafe, as always we appreciate your time when you visit and your wonderful comments! 

If you like what you see here, we would appreciate it if you told your friends (we would love more followers!), if not, tell us. Our goal is to share relevant information that you will use and enjoy. 


And now, it is very easy to sign up for
Our Sunday Cafe posts by email. You will find the form located in the left sidebar, thank you for subscribing!


this post shared with:
hearth and soul@premeditated leftovers
full plate thursday@miz helen's
food friday @ carole's chatter
4

Wild Plum, Port and Cinnamon Jam, Recipe rewind because some things are too good to miss!

Recipe rewind, because in the beginning there is a blogger who has no readers. She still posts great food in hopes that the readers will come..........you can also view it here in the archives, Monday August 3, 2009.

Tonight I got around to making the jam, and it sure is pretty. Smells wonderful also, plums, port and cinnamon. I did not really use a recipe, but followed the guidelines - somewhat.

Wild plums, these were harvested from a flowering plum tree.

Plums have a lot of pectin naturally, so I felt confident that the jam would be just right with a double recipe and only 1 package of pectin. I had made a wonderful plum butter out of some leftover plums and used no pectin, it turned out wonderful and was gone in 3 days.

My favorite part of jam making is the little bit that doesn't fit into a jar. You get to enjoy it now. We always had bread and butter as part of dinner on jam making days, back in the day........


At this point I had the clean jars resting in a 250 degree oven. And the pan to the rear holds rings and lids, resting in hot (not boiling) water.

This pan of fruit puree, was started on Sunday. It contains 6-8 cups of the cherry size plums washed and left whole. 1 c port wine and 4 cinnamon sticks. Brought to a boil, and then simmered for  45 - 60 minutes. Set aside to cool. When cool remove cinnamon sticks, strain fruit through a stainless steel colander, stir gently to push fruit solids and through the holes. You will have a small mound of pits and some skin remnants to throw out.

I measured the puree, I had 6 liquid cups. I added equal sugar and the juice from 1 large lemon. Then it went into the fridge to rest until I was ready/had the time to finish.

To finish, stir 1 package of pectin into the puree, bring to a boil. Boil rapidly for 1 minute (you might want to check your pectin brand, it might be different).

Ladle int into 8, 8 oz jars, cap and place in boiling water bath. Process for 10 minutes starting after the water has returned a boil.

Remove jars from pot, set aside to cool. You should hear the "ping" of the seals coming down.

Makes 8, 8 oz jars and a little bit for now.


As always, thanks for taking a moment to stop and say hello. I appreciate your time and your wonderful comments!

this post is shared with:
full plate thursday@miz helen's
gallery of favorites@premeditated leftovers
5
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