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Perfect Date Cake

Welcome to Our Sunday Café, we are pleased you stopped by for a visit. Today we are offering another delicious recipe from our kitchen. We hope you enjoy it as much as we did…

This cake is perfect for smaller families because of the keeping quality. I baked it for our Sunday dinner and we finished it up on Thursday and honestly it was just as good on the last day, as the first.

It is wonderful plain, but of course, a bit of whipped cream or vanilla bean ice cream never hurts!

Perfect Date Cake, stays moist, perfect for smaller families.
Perfect Date Cake.

Perfect Date Cake
adapted from: A Cake Bakes in Brooklyn
350-degree oven

1 c chopped dates
1 t baking soda
1 c boiling water

1/2 c butter
1 c sugar
1 egg
1 1/2 c flour
1/2 t salt
1 t cinnamon
1/8 t cloves
2 t vanilla


Pour boiling water over the dates and baking soda, let stand until cool.


Cream butter and sugar beat in egg and continue to beat until creamy.

Whisk together the flour spices and salt. Add half to the creamed butter along with half of the cooled date mixture. Combine until mixed (do not beat), repeat with remaining flour mixture and date mixture and the vanilla.


Turn into a prepared 9-inch pan, bake 35-45 minutes or until done in your oven.

Let cool, sprinkle with confectioners sugar if desired.

Enjoy!

Thank you for visiting Our Sunday Cafe, as always we appreciate your time when you visit and your wonderful comments! 

If you like what you see here, we would appreciate it if you told your friends (we would love more followers!), if not, tell us. Our goal is to share relevant information that you will enjoy and use for yourself and your family. 


You can also sign up for Our Sunday Cafe posts by email, thank you for subscribing!

this post shared with:
weekend cooking @ beth fish reads
see ya in the gumbo @ ms enplace
homestead barn hop @ prairie homestead
tuesdays with a twist @ back to basics

4

Southern Green Beans

Welcome to Our Sunday Café, we are pleased you stopped by for a visit. Today we are offering another delicious recipe from our kitchen. We hope you enjoy it as much as we did…

Green beans are in our freezer for use this winter. Having grown in our garden this summer. I have never been a big fan of green beans, until growing our own. There is something satisfying about cooking what you grow. There is a lot we have learned about growing what you will cook.....

Southern Green Beans, with Potatoes and Bacon
Southern Green Beans

We were successful with green beans last year and again this year. However, we did not grow the same beans this year. This year we grew tri-colored beans. They are beautiful as well as tasty. You will see that once cooked, magically the beans are all the same color.


Southern Green Beans
adapted from:  Lost Recipes, meals to share with family and friends

3-4 slices of bacon - diced
2-3 scallions - cut into 1-inch pieces  (you can also use 1/4 c chopped onion)
1 pound green beans - snap the end and pull the string, then snap into 1 inch lengths
salt and pepper to taste
1 c water
3 medium potatoes, peeled (if desired) and diced

Heat a Dutch oven or heavy bottom pan over medium heat, add bacon and scallions. Cook until lightly browned. Remove excess bacon fat.


Add green beans, salt and pepper and water. Cover and cook over medium heat for 10 minutes.


Add potatoes, stir to mix. Cover and cook additional 30 minutes.


Check once or twice to make sure the green beans have not cooked dry. Remove cover, boil down excess pan juices if desired, taking care not to scorch.

Serve hot.

Enjoy!

Thank you for visiting Our Sunday Cafe, as always we appreciate your time when you visit and your wonderful comments! 

If you like what you see here, we would appreciate it if you told your friends (we would love more followers!), if not, tell us. Our goal is to share relevant information that you will use and enjoy. 

And now, it is very easy to sign up for
Our Sunday Cafe posts by email. You will find the form located in the left sidebar, thank you for subscribing!


PS, you may also enjoy our Homemade Household page, it can be found right at the top of the blog!


this post shared with:
cook your books @ kitchen flavors
weekend cooking @ beth fish reads
homestead barn hop @ prairie homestead
3

Smokey and Savory, Side Dish of Beans

Welcome to Our Sunday Café, we are pleased you stopped by for a visit. Today we are offering another delicious recipe from our kitchen. We hope you enjoy it as much as we did…

We enjoy beans. We usually have several kinds of cooked beans and bean dishes in the freezer, making it so easy to round out a meal. And since this is a second bean dish in less than a week, you can tell, our stocks had run low in the freezer!

As I have mentioned from time to time, it took me a long time to successfully cook beans. And I believe that it can be traced back to a dear Mother who only cooked them out of a sense of duty and the ease and availability of canned beans in every market. Canned beans are worth of pantry space and we use a lot of canned beans on top of the ones we cook. There are several recipes we make over and over, calling for canned beans.

Keep cooked beans on hand for the beginning of many great meals.
Slow cooker beans, so easy!
I have been making beans in this style since this original post-August 6, 2008. Before a camera, before readers, before I had the skills I have today. I have changed things up a bit because I no longer see cooking beans as a recipe, but more of a process, adapting to what you have on hand and getting a delicious kettle of beans in the process. You really cannot go wrong with cooking beans. Some folks prefer beans with a little broth if so cut back by a cup or so on the water. However I love broths, so my beans usually have some broth to spoon up and enjoy.

Sometimes beans are easier to digest with a bit of acid, for that you will find a suggestion to add a touch of red wine vinegar at the end of cooking time or at the table when serving.

Actually the less you do to beans, really the better they are.

Smokey and Savory, side dish of beans
adapted from: good cooks everywhere
makes a lot!
requires:  a 5 qt slow cooker

2 pounds small white beans, soaked overnight and drained
ham scraps, ham hock or smoked hock bones
1 large onion minced
3-4 carrots, peeled and shredded
2 large tomatoes OR the equivalent smaller ones
2 large potatoes OR the equivalent smaller ones
1/4 green pepper minced if desired
1-2 stalks celery minced if desired
1 T thyme leaves, crumbled
2 large bay leaves
2-3 t salt
2 qt water, brought to a boil but not mandatory
red wine vinegar, if desired


Don't waste the flavor, ham and beans are a natural pairing.
Richly browned ham, for extra flavor.

Dice and brown ham scraps, drain excess fat if needed.


Place smoked ham hocks in the bottom of slow cooker. Add all carrot, onion, pepper, and celery (if using) thyme leaves and bay leaves. Add the drained beans.


Note:  this much food will fill the slow cooker to the top. But it does fit, and since the beans have been soaked, they are almost as large as they will be when completely cooked.

Every part of this dish comes together to create a delicious pot of beans.
Potatoes, tomatoes, and ham, add so much flavor to your beans. 




This is the last of the potatoes and tomatoes from volunteer plants we found growing in the garden.


Place the tomatoes and potatoes on top. Add the browned ham bits if using. Add salt starting with 2 teaspoons. Just barely cover with beans with boiling water, you need not worry about the tomatoes and potatoes. Bringing water to a boil is a new step but will ensure that you have tender beans in 8 hours on low.


When cooked, remove the potatoes and tomatoes and allow to cool. Fish out the ham hocks from the bottom of the cooker, let cool. When cool enough to handle, remove meat from the ham hocks, dice and return to the beans. Remove skin from the vegetables, mash with a fork and stir back into the beans. Taste for seasonings and correct if needed. If desired add 2-4 T red wine vinegar or offer the vinegar along with a bottle of hot sauce when serving, for those that like food a bit spicier!


And with that, you have a delicious pot of beans.

As always thanks for taking a moment to stop and say hello. We appreciate your time and your wonderful comments!

recipe rating:  Oh yes, will make again!

this post shared with:
home acre hop @ prudent living
homestead barn hop @ the prairie homestead
homemade mondays @ frugal by choice
see ya in the gumbo @ ms enplace
3

Creamy Ham and Scalloped Potatoes, a slow cooker recipe

Welcome to Our Sunday Café, we are pleased you stopped by for a visit. Today we are offering another delicious recipe from our kitchen. We hope you enjoy it as much as we did…

We are still running a bit in the slow lane since coming down with the early season release, upper respiratory virus, but we see light at the end of the tunnel. On Saturday my dear husband got this dish into the slow cooker for our dinner, and while my photo is not as beautiful as the one in the recipe book, these potatoes are delicious!

But I ask you, how can you go wrong with potatoes bathed in ham juices and surrounded by cheese? Well yes, I thought you might agree......


Creamy Ham and Scalloped Potatoes
adapted from:  Fix It and Forget It, New Cookbook
makes approximately 8 dinner servings
this recipe uses a 5 qt cooker

1 (packaged) ham steak, trimmed of excess fat and diced or 2 c diced if using leftover ham
8-10 medium potatoes, thinly sliced (we did not peel)
1 large onion, thinly sliced
Salt and Pepper to taste
1 can cream of mushroom soup
1 c grated cheddar cheese
Paprika

Place half the potatoes, ham, and onion in the bottom of the slow cooker, season with salt and pepper.

Cover with half of the grated cheese

Repeat layers, seasoning, and cheese.

Empty the soup into a bowl and whisk until creamy, then pour over the top layer.

Cook on low 6-8 hours or until the potatoes are tender.

When ready to serve, sprinkle with paprika if desired.

Creamy Ham and Scalloped Potatoes, a slow cooker recipe
Creamy Ham And Scalloped Potatoes
These potatoes are rich and earthy, we will definitely make these again.

Enjoy!

Thank you for visiting Our Sunday Cafe, as always we appreciate your time when you visit and your wonderful comments! 

If you like what you see here, we would appreciate it if you told your friends (we would love more followers!), if not, tell us. Our goal is to share relevant information that you will use and enjoy. 

And now, it is very easy to sign up for
Our Sunday Cafe posts by email. You will find the form located in the left sidebar, thank you for subscribing!


PS, you may also enjoy our Homemade Household page, it can be found right at the top of the blog!


this post shared with:
see ya in the gumbo @ ms enplace
motivation monday @ life in balance
homemade mondays @ frugal by choice
3

Simple and Savory, side dish of beans

Welcome to Our Sunday Café, we are pleased you stopped by for a visit. Today we are offering another delicious recipe from our kitchen. We hope you enjoy it as much as we did…

With the weather changing it is time once again to cook up a pot of beans. We eat them year round, but for some reason, cooking beans seem more like a cooler weather task. These beans are meatless, yet very delicious and they go with just about everything! If you prefer, add a ham bone or a couple of smoked hocks. And by the way, they freeze great too.....

Basic cooking technique for beans, works for any kind of bean your want to cook.
Simple and Savory, side dish of beans.

This is a basic process recipe and one you can't go wrong with or make a mistake with. Good quality food, cooked simply is always delicious. Today we cooked Cranberry Beans, using the whole package as purchased (1 lb 11 oz). Cranberry Beans are new to me, as are so many other types, but in time I am sure I will cook them all.

Sometimes beans are easier to digest with a bit of acid, for that you will find a suggestion to add a touch of red wine vinegar at the end of cooking time or at the table when serving.

Simple and Savory Beans
adapted from: many great cooks before me
makes lots!

1 pound of dried beans, soaked overnight and drained
1 medium onion, minced
4 cloves garlic
2 carrots, peeled and grated
1 large or 2 medium potatoes, washed and cut in half - do not peel
1 large or 2 medium tomatoes, washed and cut in half - do not peel
water
2-3 t salt
red wine vinegar, if desired
I thought it would be a good idea to spear the garlic so that it could be mashed, and returned to the beans, but alas the garlic cooked into a puree. I did find the toothpicks, however.


Place carrots and onions in bottom of a large slow cooker, add drained beans. Add water until the water is 1-2 inches above the beans.

This simple cooking style can be used for any kind of bean.
Cranberry beans, ready to cook.

 Place the tomatoes and potatoes on top of beans, add salt. Cook on high 8 hours.


When beans are cooked, remove potatoes and tomatoes from the beans and let cool. Remove skin, and discard.


Mash both the potato and tomato, return the mashed vegetables to the bean pot, stir gently to mix. Taste and adjust seasoning if desired.

If you prefer your bean dish to have more acid, stir in 2 T red wine vinegar, of offer vinegar before serving. At the table, offer a bottle of hot sauce for those that like things a bit spicier!

Makes about 2 quarts

Thank you for visiting Our Sunday Cafe, as always we appreciate your time when you visit and your wonderful comments! 

If you like what you see here, we would appreciate it if you told your friends (we would love more followers!), if not, tell us. Our goal is to share relevant information that you will use and enjoy. 

And now, it is very easy to sign up for
Our Sunday Cafe posts by email. You will find the form located in the left sidebar, thank you for subscribing!


PS, you may also enjoy our Homemade Household page, it can be found right at the top of the blog!

this post shared with:
hearth and soul @ apriljharris.com
home acre hop @ prudent living
full plate thursday @ miz helens
see ya in the gumbo @ ms enplace
motivation monday @ life in balance
homemade mondays @ frugal by choice


6

Sourdough Parsley and Parmesan Cheese Muffins

Welcome to Our Sunday Café, we are pleased you stopped by for a visit. Today we are offering another delicious recipe from our kitchen. We hope you enjoy it as much as we did…

Sourdough Parsley and Parmesan Cheese Muffins, another easy self rising flour recipe.
Sourdough Parsley and Parmesan Cheese Muffins

I have taken a shine to this easy muffin recipe using self rising flour. Self rising flour is easily made at home. The advantage of making your own, would be that you can choose the ingredients that go into the flour mix, just like choosing the other foods you feed your family. I prefer using part whole wheat flour when I make self rising flour. The choice is your own. You can find an easy recipe here. This smaller recipe is perfect just for the two of us.........

Sourdough Parsley and Parmesan Cheese Muffins
by the seat of my pants
425 degree oven

1 1/2 c self rising flour
4 T full fat mayonnaise

1/4 c Parmesan cheese
1/2 c chopped fresh parsley

2/3 c sourdough starter - note: a wet starter (50/50 mix of wet to dry) works best
3-4 T milk - if needed

Cut mayonnaise into flour until mixture resembles coarse crumbs.

Fresh Parsley is delicious in foods, and a wonderful source of vitamins.

Stir in parsley and Parmesan cheese.

Stir in starter and milk if needed. Do not over mix.

Divide into 6 muffin cups, bake 15-18 minutes, or until done in your oven. Muffins will be very light in color, do not over bake.

Sourdough Parsley and Parmesan Cheese Muffins, ready to serve.
Sourdough Parsley and Parmesan Cheese Muffins, fresh from the oven.

Turn on their sides in the muffin pan to cool briefly.

Enjoy!

Thank you for visiting Our Sunday Cafe, as always we appreciate your time when you visit and your wonderful comments! 

If you like what you see here, we would appreciate it if you told your friends (we would love more followers!), if not, tell us. Our goal is to share relevant information that you will enjoy and use for yourself and your family. 

You can also sign up for Our Sunday Cafe posts by email, thank you for subscribing!

this post shared with:
happiness is homemade @ mommy on demand
see ya in the gumbo @ ms enplace
homemade mondays @ frugal by choice
hearth and soul @ apriljharris.com
home acre hop @ prudent living
full plate thursday @ miz helens
8

A Simple and Delicious Dry Rub for Meat, recipe rewind because some things are too good to miss!

We are finally coming out from under the effects of a very difficult to shake, upper respirator virus. And I for one could not be happier, it seemed like it was never going to end! We have a few more chores to get done before the rains start, namely the chimney needs to be cleaned, and we have plants to get into the ground in the flower beds.

We are looking forward to wood stove fires, books and music in the evenings. A little more time to settle in and enjoy the company of the other. This dry rub is very good, and it was posted in a time when I believe it got like 3 "clicks" which to not really enough considering how tasty it is! So that calls for a recipe rewind, if I do say so myself...........let's get started shall we?

Simple and Delicious Dry Rub for Meats
by the seat of my pants
makes about 1/2 c
1/c c Paula Deen house salt*
2 T brown sugar
1/2 t chili powder
1/2 t dry mustard
1 T paprika
dash cayenne
1/2 t oregano
1/2 t basil
1/2 thyme

Grind your dry herbs in a pestle, combine all ingredients and mix well. Store in labeled bags in a cool dry place.

* Paula Deen House Salt (I usually only make a half recipe at a time....)
1 c salt
1/4 c pepper
1/4 c granulated garlic
Combine and store in a cool dry area.

To use, rub generously on meat, let rest 30-60 minutes, grill or bake as preferred.

Tip:  to make is a bit more rustic, use smoked paprika.

Recipe rating:  Oh Yes! (will make again)

As always thanks for taking a minute to stop and say hello. We appreciate your time and your wonderful comments!

this post shared with:
food on friday @ carols chatter
foodie friday @ rattlebridge farm

3

Mustard Oregano Chicken or Chops

Welcome to Our Sunday Café, we are pleased you stopped by for a visit. Today we are offering another delicious recipe from our kitchen. We hope you enjoy it as much as we did…

We have been enjoying this dish for many years. I have served it at my Sunday Cafe dinners, more than once. It would be safe to say this is one of our regularly enjoyed dinners. The first time I made up this recipe, I used pork chops. Delicious!

Mustard Oregano Pork Chops
Mustard Oregano Pork Chops
Mustard Oregano Pork Chops served with buttery mashed potatoes!

Before I knew it, we tried chicken thighs, again, dinner was delicious! Now I make this up from time to time and I usually double the marinade and increase the meat in each packet. That way we have four packages of 6-8 pieces of meat in each packet. There is nothing better than a great dinner and leftovers.......

Mustard Oregano Chicken or Chops
adapted from: Fix Freeze and Feast
makes 3 packages of 4 servings

12 large bone-in chicken thighs OR 12 pork loin chops

1/2 c prepared mustard
1/4 c red wine vinegar
1/4 lemon juice
1/4 c vegetable oil
2 T honey
3 t dried oregano
3 t minced garlic (about 9 cloves)

Remove skin from chicken, remove excess fat from chops if needed.

Place 4 chops or thighs in three freezer bags, set aside.

Combine all marinade ingredients, mixing well.


Divide between the three (or more) bags.


Seal the bags, removing as much air as possible.

Massage the bag gently to place the marinade over all the surfaces of the meat.


Lay bags flat and smooth into place on a large flat pan. Place in the freezer and freeze until firm. Remove from pan and stack in the freezer as you wish.

Mustard Oregano Chicken 
Mustard Oregano Chicken with a Grilled Romaine Salad


To cook:

Outdoor cooking ~
Thaw completely in the refrigerator. Prepare a medium fire in your grill. Cook chops or thighs, turning occasionally until internal temperature is 160 degrees for chops OR 165 degrees for thighs. Remove from heat and let rest 5 minutes before serving

Indoor cooking ~

Arrange chops or thighs on a prepared broiler pan. Broil meat under high heat 5 inched from the heat source, turning frequently for 15-18 minutes or until meat tests done with a thermometer, 160 degrees for pork and 165 for chicken. Let rest 5 minutes before serving.

Enjoy!

Thank you for visiting Our Sunday Cafe, as always we appreciate your time when you visit and your wonderful comments! 

If you like what you see here, we would appreciate it if you told your friends (we would love more followers!), if not, tell us. Our goal is to share relevant information that you will use and enjoy. 

And now, it is very easy to sign up forOur Sunday Cafe posts by email. You will find the form located in the left sidebar, thank you for subscribing!

this post shared with:
full plate thursday @ miz helens
homeacre hop @ prudent living
food on friday @ carols chatter
weekend retreat @ mommy on demand
foodie friday @ rattlebridge farm




3

Virus Buster Chicken Soup...........

Welcome to Our Sunday Café, we are pleased you stopped by for a visit. Today we are offering another delicious recipe from our kitchen. We hope you enjoy it as much as we did…

Apparently, our T-cells needed some aerobics, because one or the other of us, has been ill with the fall of 2014 upper respiratory virus for the last 6 weeks. As we talked about it, we realized that we lost the last of the good weather and our last scheduled vacation week to this silly virus.

This was the summer of work around the home and the ongoing virus.......we never got away.

With my dear husband down with this pesky thing, it is time to get serious with healing from the inside out. He does not seem to be getting much better, or worse will relapse the minute he gets up to get something done. Of course for him, "getting something done" means hauling composted horse manure to the garden or chopping another cord of wood............

A rich and "good for what ails you" chicken soup
Virus Buster Chicken Soup

"Uhmmm, honey. Please come and sit down, let me bring you a bowl of chicken soup."

While I must say this is not a cure, it is curative, as all homemade chicken soup is.

This is not regular soup, and it is not even a recipe for soup. It is a process and you can use it and amend it for your own family's needs and taste preferences.  I was aiming for superior bone broth strength and lots of aromatic vegetables for flavor.

Jewish Mother Style Virus Buster Chicken Soup
by the seat of my pants
makes a lot!

12 chicken (bone in) legs
fresh filtered water, about 2-3 quarts
1 large stock pot

12 whole cloves garlic, peeled
4-6 thick slices fresh ginger, peeled
4-6 bay leaves
1/4 t peppercorns
3-4 chicken feet*
reserved bones

3 leeks, sliced
1 onion, diced
1 green pepper, diced
4-6 ribs celery diced
salt to taste

4 carrots, peeled and diced
2 c green beans, cut into 1-inch pieces
1 c peas

Cover the chicken legs with water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer about 1 hour. Turn off heat and let chicken poach in the broth. Remove chicken legs to a platter and let cool until you can remove the bone, with a quick twist. Return any broth on the platter to the stockpot. Set meat aside and let cool completely.

Cooks Wisdom:  After thought and update! The more I thought about this, I realized that the simplest solution would be to tie the bones (after removing the meet) and chick feet together with a bit of kitchen twine. Place that in the bottom of the kettle and continue to make the soup. The bones all bundled up, would be adding nutrition to the soup and be out of the way as well.

Mean while:
Bone broth with a carcass and some raw chicken feet, chicken feet make the difference!
Bones make the best broth.

In the bottom of a clean large stockpot, place the reserved bones and the chicken feet.  Add the garlic, ginger and bay leaf.

Cover this group of ingredients with a stainless steel collapsible vegetable steamer.  The goal is to continue to extract the goodness of the bones and yet keep them separate from the soup.

Add the leeks, onion, pepper and celery.

Bring to a boil, reduce heat simmer for an additional 1-2 hours.

Remove skin, etc from the reserved chicken meat. Dice or shred chicken meat, refrigerate until needed. I used half the cooked chicken meat in the soup, the rest will make some great chicken salad sandwiches!

bone stock, chicken soup, virus buster sup
Jewish Mother Style Virus Buster Chicken Soup!

When the soup has simmered the second time, add the carrots and green beans. Cook until tender.

Add reserved chicken meat, taste for seasonings, adjust if needed.

By the way, this is delicious soup, even if you don't have a virus.....

*chicken feet can be found at most large Asian markets

Thank you for visiting Our Sunday Cafe, as always we appreciate your time when you visit and your wonderful comments! 

If you like what you see here, we would appreciate it if you told your friends (we would love more followers!), if not, tell us. Our goal is to share relevant information that you will enjoy and use for yourself and your family. 


You can also sign up for Our Sunday Cafe posts by email, thank you for subscribing!

this post shared with:
hearth and soul @ apriljharris.com
homemade mondays @ frugal by choice
see ya in the gumbo @ ms enplace
homestead barn hop @ the prairie homestead
homeacre hop @ prudent living
foodie friday @ rattlebridge farm
souper sundays @ kahakai kitchen



4

Homemade Naturally Fermented Ginger Ale....

Welcome to Our Sunday Café, we are pleased you stopped by for a visit. Today we are offering another delicious recipe from our kitchen. We hope you enjoy it as much as we did…

It has been quiet on the blogging front around here for a couple of reasons, it was the first week back to work after a week's vacation and working on a somewhat long term project.

Easy homemade Naturally Fermented Ginger Ale
Naturally Fermented Ginger Ale

Who else feels that certain "returned to work fatigue" upon the end of a relaxing staycation? The creative juices are present, but so is time away from home and being tapped out at the end of the day.

The original Ginger Bug from this post molded. I was disappointed and bewildered. Having been around fermented foods since childhood, this caught me by surprise.

Although I have found some of the simplest things, can still be trying to one's sense of knowledge.......When the mold was discovered we were having a hot spell, but holy cow, mold?

So once again, it was back to the drawing board or in the case of kitchen work, the cutting board..........first make a Ginger Bug.


Directions for making a Ginger Bug
adapted from: a life unprocessed

Ginger - unpeeled for the bug process
de-chlorinated water
sugar

Day one:
Into 2-3 c water, add 2-3 T finely chopped ginger and 2 T sugar.
Stir well, cover loosely with a towel.
Stir again, later in the day.

Day two: repeat ginger and sugar, stir well, recover with the towel. Stir a second time.

Day three: repeat ginger and sugar, stir well, recover with the towel. Stir a second time.

You should see little bubbles forming around the edge of the jar where the ginger is floating on the water, when you stir, at this point, you have an active bug. If so continue on for Ginger Ale.

I could not tell being new to fermenting, so I continued on.......

Day four: repeat ginger and sugar, stir well, recover with a towel. Stir a second time.

Day five:  repeat ginger and sugar, stir well, recover with a towel. Stir a second time.

By this point, when I stirred the second time, there was effervescence action that made a nice ring of foamy bubbles, so I knew I was ready to make ginger ale!


Ginger Ale
adapted from:  a life unprocessed

2 quarts de-chlorinated water*
1/3 c sliced peeled ginger

1 1/2 c sugar  - we thought this produce a too sweet Ginger Ale, I will reduce for future batches.

additional de-chlorinated water

1 empty gallon jar


Boil the sliced ginger in the 2 quarts of water for 20 minutes. Let cool until warm. Strain out the ginger slices, add sugar and stir until dissolved. Transfer to the gallon jar, add additional water until fluid level is 2 inches below the shoulder of the jar. When contents are cooled to room temperature, stir in 1 c of the strained ginger bug.

Cover loosely  with toweling. The second stop is a 3 day process, but first process the bug for future use.

Much like a sourdough starter, the Ginger Bug must be fed and stored for future use.

Photo of a Ginger Bug and a batch of Ginger Ale.
Ginger Bug to the left, Ginger Ale to the right.

Re-feed the Bug:  add 1 cup de-chlorinated water, 2 T chopped ginger and 2 T sugar. Stir well, recover with a towel to rest over night and reestablish fermentation. The next day, stir to see that is is active, if so refrigerate until needed. If sluggish, feed again, stirring twice. Then refrigerate.

The truth is, there is no absolute with naturally fermented foods, you must learn as you go, and go forward with what has been learned. This can be difficult to translate in a media where exact measurements are the preferred standard.

And now, back to the Ginger Ale:

day one: stir in the morning and again in the evening.

day two: stir in the morning and again in the evening.

day three: stir in the morning and again in the evening.

Ginger Ale ready to bottle and store to increase the carbonation.
Ginger Ale, ready to bottle. 

On day four, you will want to bottle up the ale, using a top hasp bottle.




The final stir before bottling, shows some bubbles (carbonation). 


It is easier to decant into a small pitcher, and then pour into the funnel/strainer combination, rather than ladle.


Sit the fine mesh strainer into the funnel, then rest the handle on something about the same height, to keep everything steady.


After bottling, secure the hasp and let sit out one more day, for carbonation to build up. Then refrigerate. Do not let sit out once bottled more than the one day, too much pressure may build up.

Caution Warning!: 

Because this is a naturally fermented product the Ginger Ale may act like a poorly opened bottle of Champagne and while that is charming in a movie, you don't want ginger ale all over your home. So I suggest opening the bottle slowly while standing at the kitchen sink with the bottle over the sink to catch any escaping fluid. I think the trick here is to be careful and patient at the same time. I only point this out, because commercially prepared drinks do not require such behavior.......

When ready to drink, open carefully and pour gently into a glass.

Enjoy!

* to de-chlorinate water, simply fill a large pitcher (or two)  with water and let sit overnight to allow the chlorine to dissipate.

Thank you for visiting Our Sunday Cafe, as always we appreciate your time when you visit and your wonderful comments! 

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this post shared with:
full plate thursday @ miz helens
home acre hop @ prudent living
foodie friday @ rattlebridge farm
friendship friday @ create with joy
homestead barn hop @ the prairie homestead
see ya in the gumbo @ ms enplace
hearth and soul @ apriljharris.com



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