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Roast Pork with Potatoes and Onions, a slow cooker recipe

Welcome to Our Sunday Café, we are pleased you stopped by for a visit. Today we are offering another delicious recipe from our kitchen. We hope you enjoy it as much as we did…

Everyone could use a few simple recipes for the slow cooker, for those busy times, including us. When it comes to using the slow cooker, my dear husband is much better at it, than I. The reason? He is much more relaxed in the kitchen.

He will scan a cookbook for a recipe that catches his eye and make it, as instructed. I love those dinners! This recipe allows for creative interpretation with suggestions for ingredients to swap in specific categories, which appeals to my creative side.

Roast Pork with Potatoes and Onions, a slow cooker recipe
Roast Pork with Potatoes and Onions

Pork Roast with Potatoes and Onion
adapted from:  FIX IT and FORGET IT Cookbook, Feasting from your Slow Cooker.
Submitted by:  Trudy Kutter from Corfu NY

2 1/2-3 pounds boneless pork loin
1 large garlic clove, slivered
1 t olive oil plus 1 t butter
5-6 potatoes, cut in quarters lengthwise or equivalent amount of small red potatoes, left whole
1 large onion, diced
3/4 c broth, tomato juice, water, beer or wine
1 1/2 T soy sauce

1 T cornstarch
1 T cold water

Make slits in the roast, insert the slivers of garlic. In a large saute pan, add oil and butter. Brown roast on all sides, place in slow cooker. Add onions to the pan, saute lightly until golden. Add to roast in a
slow cooker along with the potatoes. Add liquid and soy sauce to skillet, scrape up any brown bits while de-glazing the pan, pour over roast, cover, and cook on low 8 hours.

Stir together cornstarch and cold water, remove roast if desired and gently stir cornstarch mixture into slow cooker, turning up to high setting. Let cook an additional hour to thicken.



Enjoy!

Thank you for visiting Our Sunday Cafe, as always we appreciate your time when you visit and your wonderful comments! 

If you like what you see here, we would appreciate it if you told your friends (we would love more followers!), if not, tell us. Our goal is to share relevant information that you will use and enjoy. 

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PS, you may also enjoy our Homemade Household page, it can be found right at the top of the blog!

this post shared with:
weekend cooking @ beth fish reads


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Golden Corn Cake, The Original FANNIE FARMER 1896 Cookbook

Welcome to Our Sunday Café, we are pleased you stopped by for a visit. Today we are offering another delicious recipe from our kitchen. We hope you enjoy it as much as we did…

This little loaf is a handy one to have in your repertoire, it goes perfect with just about anything and the other night I came home to stew and Golden Corn Cake for my supper. I am sharing this recipe exactly as written.....

Fannie Farmer's Golden Corn Cake.
Golden Corn Cake, Fannie Farmer circa 1896.

Golden Corn Cake
bake 20 minutes in a "hot" oven (400 degrees for today's ovens)
makes: one loaf

3/4 c corn meal
1 1/4 c flour
1/4 c sugar
4 t baking powder
1/2 t salt
1 c milk
1 egg
1 T melted butter

Mix and sift dry ingredients; add milk, egg well beaten and butter; bake in shallow buttered pan in hot oven twenty minutes.

This is delightful bread, quick, tender and wonderful as leftovers.


Enjoy!

Thank you for visiting Our Sunday Cafe, as always we appreciate your time when you visit and your wonderful comments! 

If you like what you see here, we would appreciate it if you told your friends (we would love more followers!), if not, tell us. Our goal is to share relevant information that you will enjoy and use for yourself and your family. 

You can also sign up for Our Sunday Cafe posts by email, thank you for subscribing!



this post shared with:
weekend cooking @ beth fish reads






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Ezekiel Bread made with whole grains, our daily bread

Welcome to Our Sunday Café, we are pleased you stopped by for a visit. Today we are offering another delicious recipe from our kitchen. We hope you enjoy it as much as we did…

For me bread making has always been more of a process than an actual recipe. There is no bread that is not edible, in my opinion. True there is bread that is better than some, but bread is always usable. It might be french toast, or stuffing or even simple bread crumbs, but bread can always be used in full. Couple that with my frugal nature and bread is always used up in this household.

Ezekial Bread, an ancient idea for complete protein.
Ezekiel Bread made with whole grains.

Because of my opinions about bread (And they are just that; opinions. not facts or rules.) I am fearless or some might say foolish in the kitchen when making bread. It doesn't have to be perfect to eat or even share in a post for those that come to visit. Actually my entire content is about improvements for family and home, written like a conversation had during a visit and less like an actual article.

Bread can also be broken down into steps, which works well for those that work at home on a tight schedule or those that work out of the home. I fall into the group that works away from home, but I still want to bake our bread and cook from scratch. For our family a healthy loaf of bread means that a good meal is never far away even if it is only to scramble some eggs or heat up homemade soup or stew stored in the freezer.

When I first purchased my new mixer, I had to rethink kneading bread (especially since bread was the reason for the purchase). My Kitchen Aid would not handle a standard loaf without over heating and shutting down. The first batch was delicious, but lacking in proper texture, due to a lack of  sufficient kneading. This newer version is delicious but also has a very nice texture,yet like all yeast breads improve as the maker perfects their technique. I did make one change, I eliminated the rice for this version.

This bread is soft, stays fresh, freezes very well with no indication of being frozen and does not mold. Our family of 2 keeps a loaf on the counter (wrapped in a heavy duty plastic bag) until it is gone - 5-7 days and it is just as delicious on the last day as on the first. Yes it is a bit drier as any bread will be, but let me tell you, this bread beats store bought any day......

Ezekiel Bread with whole grains
by the seat of my pants
makes 4 loaves

1 c water
1 t cider vinegar
whole wheat flour

1/2 c raisins, chopped very fine

1/2 cracked wheat
1/2 c steel cut oats
boiling water

1 c warm water
1 T yeast
1 t sugar

1/2 c lentils - milled
3 c wheat berries - milled on pastry flour setting ( 4 cups if not milling own flour)
3- 4 T gluten flour

1/2 c coconut oil
1/2 c honey
2 eggs

1/2 c finely chopped toasted walnuts
1 T sea salt
All purpose flour  1-2 cups



Combine water, vinegar and enough whole wheat flour to make a stiff dough. Stir in raisins. Cover and set aside.
In a separate bowl or pan cover the cracked wheat and steel cut oats with boiling water, cover and set aside. Set aside 8-24 hours as your schedule dictates......

The following day:

In large bowl or bowl of stand mixer; combine warm water, yeast and sugar. Let proof.
Drain cracked wheat and steel cut oats,  add to mixer bowl, add soaked wheat and raisin mixture.

Next add in the following order:
Milled lentils, whole wheat pastry flour, gluten flour.
Coconut oil, honey eggs, salt.
Walnuts, sea salt and start with 1 c all purpose flour for kneading.

Knead mixture until dough is formed and the sides of the bowl are clean, using only the smallest amount of additional all purpose flour needed.

Serious yeast action!

Let rise, covered until doubled.

Divide the dough to form loaves.

Punch down, divide into 4 equal parts.


Ezekial Bread, beginning of second rise.

Place into prepared pans for second rise, I like to use the dough proofing setting, but any warm environment will work just fine.

Ready to bag and freeze.

Bake in preheated 350 degree oven 35-45 minutes or until done in your oven. The loaves will have shrunk away from the sides of the pan and turn out perfectly.


There is no escaping the clean up!

When bread is completely cooled, wrap and freeze until needed.

Enjoy!

Thank you for visiting Our Sunday Cafe, as always we appreciate your time when you visit and your wonderful comments! 

If you like what you see here, we would appreciate it if you told your friends (we would love more followers!), if not, tell us. Our goal is to share relevant information that you will enjoy and use for yourself and your family. 

You can also sign up for Our Sunday Cafe posts by email, thank you for subscribing!

this post shared with:
weekend cooking @ beth fish reads
homemade mondays @ frugal by choice
hearth and soul @ apriljharris.com

#homemadeBread.

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McGyverize a makeshift water bath canner


Planning for retirement is almost a full time job!

Seriously, it is.....One might think that the whole act of not working would in fact mean that you don't really have to work hard at not working, but there is more to it than that.

First off we want to retire at the coast. However we currently don't live at the coast. This location deficit can be investigated over the internet, but does require traveling (as it is turning out) regularly to get the actual feel  of a neighborhood or placement of a new home. Whew, like I said a part time job in addition to everything else.....

As a matter of fact I have been a bit unsettled since we made the decision, because there really is so much to do. We won't actually make the move until next spring when we sell one of the houses here and make a purchase of another home at the coast. But in the next few months we will be traveling back and forth until we learn the location of where we would prefer to live.

We are definitely working on making the dream come true!

We are not falling in love with any house currently up for sale, as it most likely won't be available when we are ready to purchase, but we are settling on a location. Of course in a perfect world, we would like to be in one of the developments that offers the lake to the east and the ocean to the west.

You may have read this post about placing an offer on a fixer? Gosh we were so ready and had fallen hard for the location. Unfortunately we are withdrawing our offer with the feasibility study clause, as the septic has failed and of course the new buyers would be needing to replace it, cha-ching!

So this is where we move on to the more realistic plan of trading houses with the kids and selling the smaller one, which will work out better in a sluggish market. We are now looking at next spring, but trust me, we will be ready to move forward!

And now, news from the kitchen....

The garden is winding down, but I did can 5 pints of diced tomatoes last night. There is chard to get processed for the freezer and a couple remaining acorn squash to pick before we retire the vines. I have raspberry juice to make into jelly, however it is safely stored in the freezer until I have a free afternoon later this fall or even in the winter, maybe right before Christmas.

I have had problems canning on my glass top stove and to be honest I want the next house to have a regular old fashioned electric range with coils. I won't mind, and my water bath canner will appreciate the simplicity of it also. But in the meanwhile I took the opportunity to take a few gadgets found around the house and makeshift a canning kettle that does not have the rippled bottom, which is the problem on the glass top stove.

You can use what you have available, here is a suggestion.


Here we are using jar rings, a steamer rack and paint sticks.


The jar rings give lift off the bottom of the pan.


Place the rack you are using over the rings, this rack is not perfect, but is what I have currently. A round cake cooling rack would be great.


Heavy duty poultry shears or equivalent will cut the wood easily. Lay the stick across the top of the pan and then cut short a bit so the stick slips easily into the pan.

This is an experiment in progress...I can tell that there is plenty of room to double up on the sticks. 

Load your canner with jars and slip a wooden piece between to keep the jars from traveling and bumping into each other during the processing time.




Lay the sticks in opposite directions and on each end wind the twine in the indent meant for your thumb when you stir paint. 

Cut the remaining sticks, using cotton twine double up the wooden pieces, by wrapping twine at each end and knotting firmly (several times, just in case.).

How about you, how have your improvised in your kitchen?

If you like what you see here, we would appreciate it if you told your friends, if not, tell us! Our goal is to share relevant information that you will enjoy and use for yourself and your family. 

Thank you for visiting Our Sunday Cafe, as always we appreciate your time when you visit and your wonderful comments! 
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