June 2012 - Our Sunday Cafe
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Apricot Riesling Jam, Recipe rewind because some things are too good to miss!


Recipe rewind, because in the beginning there is a blogger who has no readers. She still posts great food in hopes that the readers will come..........you can also view it here in the archives, Wednesday July 22, 2009.



I am so in love with small batch preserving! I am also making new memories of canning and jamming. In previous years when I was a SAHM, I canned about everything we ate. Jams, fruit, tomatoes, pickles, relish and even a canned grape drink from the concord grapes in the back yard. I told the kids it was homemade "koolaid".

After I went to work full time, I wanted to return to canning and jamming, but honestly while working 6 days a week, this was not a reality. I missed the homemade treats and to a lesser degree I missed making them. Granted I did not want to return to canning at the level I did and work a full time job, but still I missed part of those days.

Fast forward 20 years (Eeee gads!) and I am back to it. I found this recipe and knew I wanted had to make it.

Apricot Riesling Jam

adapted from Simply Recipes


Find 2 1/2 pounds of ripe apricots. If they are not ripe enough, let them sit a few days to mellow and make your jam then.

Clean cut in half, remove the pit and chop up. I usually dice my fruit, about the size of dinner peas. You should have 5 cups (or so, you know a 1/2 cup either way will not matter)

I had read on another blog that if you combine your fruit and the sugar and let it sit overnight with the pits, you will not need to add pectin. This recipe did not call for pectin, but I thought - why not. Apricot jam has a reputation of not "setting" up.

With a tight schedule, this 2 step process is great, I was able to accomplish what I would usually save for the weekend. Before you begin cooking you will need to do the following:

Have 4-6 jars (half pint) ready, including the domes and rings. Place the domes and rings in a pan of very hot, not boiling water, cover and set aside.

Turn your jars upside down in a small glass pan, add an inch of hot water. Set in a 200 degree oven while you cook the jam. Your jars will be hot and sterilized when the jam is cook and ready.

Place 2 small plates in the freezer.

Now to make the jam............

In this pan and boiling like mad:

5 c chopped apricots
2 3/4 c sugar*

juice of 1 large lemon
1/2 c Riesling

Bring mixture to a rolling boil, stirring constantly. Let boil 5 minutes stirring constantly. Reduce heat to medium and let gently boil for about 20 minutes. You will notice the mixture thickening and will need to be there and stir frequently the first 10 minutes, constantly the last 10 minutes.

When the cooking time is up, your jam should look like this. Take one plate from the freezer and add a small teaspoon of jam to it. The jam will cool quickly. Is the jam thick enough for your preference, if so you are done cooking. If not cook another 5 minutes and test again.

Fill your jars to within 1/4 inch. I always prepare extra jars - just in case. Take a wet cloth and wipe the top of the jar, this will ensure a good seal.

Give your jars a 10 minute boiling water bath. I did not have a rack that would fit in the bottom of this pan, so I put a cloth dishtowel between the jars and the bottom of the pan. Worked like a charm.

Use a jar lifter to remove from water, the lids will begin "pinging" when the jars are removed from the water, that is the sound of success.

Store in a cool dry area, should keep 1 year. However this is delicious, it won't last a year.

*if you did the overnight fruit/pit soak, the sugar is already with the fruit,

As always, thanks for taking a moment to stop and say hello. I appreciate your time and your wonderful comments!

this post is shared with:
full plate thursday@miz helen's
foodie friday@rattlebridge farm
9

Quinoa Tabbouleh, Recipe rewind because some things are too good to miss!

Recipe rewind, because in the beginning there is a blogger who has no readers. She still posts great food in hopes that the readers will come..........you can also view it here in the archives, Saturday August 7, 2010.


There is a small chain of family run cafes that serve delicious Mediterranean food, The Jerusalem Cafe.  I have enjoyed eating there for many years. I have always loved the Tabbouleh, it is so good. The thing I really enjoy  about the food is that it is real home cooking.

When I first starting eating there about 15 years ago, Mom and Dad cooked, in the first little spot in downtown Vancouver. Now the different cafes are run by family members, and even with Mom and Dad retired it is the same food and just like home.

The tabbouleh is big on vegetables with lots of parsley and lemon. Also it is made with whole wheat couscous, instead of Bulgar. But today I will (try to) translate my love of their tabbouleh into this recipe for Quinoa Tabbouleh.


Quinoa Tabbouleh
by the seat of my pants!

2-3 c cooked Quinoa
1 bunch green onions, cleaned and sliced through 2 inches of the green section


1 bunch parsley, washed, shook dry and chopped
juice of 1/2 lemon*
1 tomato - diced small
1 English cucumber - diced small

1- 2 T minced fresh mint  - optional
olive oil to moisten, up to 1/4 c
1/2 t salt
Combine gently, chill until serving time. Enjoy.

* if you enjoy the tang of lemon, use the whole lemon.
Serves 4-6

As always,
thanks so much for stopping by!

this post shared with:
full plate thursday@ miz helens
3

Blueberry Breakfast Cheesecake, Recipe rewind because some things are too good to miss!

Recipe rewind, because in the beginning there is a blogger who has no readers. She still posts great food in hopes that the readers will come..........you can also view it here in the archives, Sunday April 25, 2010.



I have mentioned before that I especially enjoy Sunday breakfast with a "touch of sweet" as my Grandmother use to call coffee cake or any other "what not" that was baked up to be served with the meal.

There were two kinds of sweets eaters in my family. Our Mother preferred sweet to be the dominate flavor of a meal like breakfast. She would frequently have toast with (lots!) of King Kelly Orange Marmalade, taking a small spoonful of the marmalade for each bite of toast. This was washed down with coffee, that was sugared, but only lightly.

Our Father liked a big breakfast, with a "touch of sweet" at the end. I am sure he got that from his Mother, who was a wonderful cook and loved to bake. I am more like our Father, my first taste choice is not sweet. I like this cake along with eggs and a couple slices of bacon, it is delicious and not too sweet.

My row of blueberry bushes. I am wanting to add more, can you have too many?















This is the first time I have made this with a food processor.  The entire recipe worked up very quickly.  No excuses now, it will be fun to try different fruits in season, but there are always blueberries in the freezer!

Blueberry Breakfast Cheesecake
from the binder collection, adapted from (I believe) Sunset magazine.
425 degrees

2 c flour
1/2 c sugar
1 t salt
1/2 t cinnamon
1/2 c butter (cut the cube down the middle and then crosswise in 1/4 inch slices)
2 eggs
1 t vanilla
 
1 16oz container cottage cheese
1/2 c sugar
1 T flour

2 c blueberries
1/4 c sugar
1/2 t cinnamon

Combine dry ingredients in a food processor and pulse until crumbs. In a large bowl beat the 2 eggs with the vanilla, stir in crumbs, continue to stir until mixture is large clumps. Dump into the bottom of a 9X13 pan and using your hands, pat evenly over the bottom.













Add the cottage cheese, sugar and flour to the processor bowl (no need to wash), process until smooth. Pour over the crumb base.

Sprinkle with the blueberries, combine the last of the sugar and cinnamon and sprinkle over the top.

Bake 30 minutes
Serves 12 - 15

As always thanks for taking a moment to stop and say hello, I appreciate your time and your wonderful comments!

this post is shared with:
full plate thursday@miz helen's
gallery of favorites@premetated leftovers
7

Buttery Cheese Spread, Recipe rewind, because some things are too good to miss!

Recipe rewind, because in the beginning there is a blogger who has no readers. She still posts great food in hopes that the readers will come..........you can also view it here in the archives, Monday January 10, 2011.


And then there's Barbara.....


I received a lidded food container at Christmas. It was filled with a buttery cheese spread, made by Barbara. The recipe for this delicious spread had been safely carried around by her, for years and years. She indicated to me when I made my copy, that the copy she had, even survived a fire.

Now let me tell you, Barbara is a wonderful woman. She has worked hard her whole life and still in retirement works hard. She does all that she can for her neighbors in our little community and enjoys her granddaughter before and after school.Like I said, busy busy busy.

Years ago Barbara worked at a restaurant call:

THE PANTRY
Portland's favorite restaurant-lounge...across from the Lloyd Center. 

She thought it was about 1958, and probably her first job as an adult. In those days the waitresses wore a uniform consisting of a short skirt with lots of petticoats, and a garter belt. That garter belt held a cap gun!

All dinner entrees came with creamed spinach, and if you did not eat your spinach the waitress got to "shoot" you with her cap gun. Yes ladies and gentlemen those were the days! I hear tell that even though creamed spinach was on every plate (yes, every plate), not every diner enjoyed it. Either that or they loved that little cap gun. Honestly, knowing the Barbara of today, I think she would of  had a real good time with that cap gun.

The Pantry closed many years ago, but it must have been very popular. There is a copykat recipe for the Chicken Bisque Soup listed on this weathered copy. You can find it here


Since being given that little container of cheesy goodness, I have come up with a lot of reasons to have toast with my dinner. It is that good.

On grocery shopping day I hope Honey will pick up a french roll, because I want to slice it down the middle, spread  it thickly with this butter and run it under the broiler. What I might serve it with I haven't a clue, but I will be having some delicious, buttery, cheesy bread for my dinner!

When Barbara started at The Pantry, this was already a favorite of the patrons!

Cheese Spread
adapted from:
THE PANTRY Restaurant

1 pound butter
1/2 pound Sharp Cheddar Cheese - grated
1/4 pound Romano cheese - grated
1 t Worcestershire sauce
1/4 t garlic powder
1/2 t paprika

Have all ingredients at room temperature. Combine ingredients with a stand mixer, starting out slowly and increasing speed. Mix/whip until fluffy.

To use, spread on sourdough or French bread and toast under the broiler.

As always, thank you for taking a moment to stop by. I appreciate your time and your wonderful comments!

this post is shared with:
full plate thursday@ Miz Helens
foodie friday@rattlebridge farm
7
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