2013 - Our Sunday Cafe
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Pumpkin Pie Ice Cream, Recipe rewind, because some things are too good to miss!

Recipe rewind, because in the beginning there is a blogger who has no readers. She still posts great food in hopes that the readers will come..........you can also view it here in the archives, Wednesday October 13, 2010.

Tuesday we had a family potluck dinner to celebrate two October birthdays. The lovely Jess, my beautiful daughter and Miss Olivia, granddaughter of the cutest order!




Cooks wisdom:  Note, this is dairy free for those that prefer.

We had a wonderful dinner of roast turkey with stuffing, a variety of vegetables and of course cake and ice cream for dessert. Now I had it in my head, turkey dinner needs pumpkin. But I did not want to make pie, I love pie, as I have confessed, but we needed birthday cake with this dinner. So I made this....

Pumpkin Pie Ice Cream
adapted from:
http://bittersweetblog.wordpress.com/2008/11/10/thoroughly-chilled/

1 15 oz Pumpkin
1 14 oz Coconut Milk
1 c brown sugar
1/4 c real maple syrup
2 T Bourbon - left this out, will use next time
2 t cinnamon
1 t ginger
1/8 t ground cloves
1/4 t salt
1 t vanilla


Combine all ingredients, stirring until sugar is dissolved.


Pour into ice cream maker and process according to manufacturers instructions.


When churned, pack into a freezer container and freeze until serving time.


Remove from freezer about 10 minutes before serving, to facilitate easy scooping!


Makes approximately 1 qt.

The ingredients for this are so easy to keep in the pantry, this will be made often, as I love pumpkin pie. 

As always, thanks for taking a minute to stop and say hello. We appreciate your time and your wonderful comments!

this post shared with:
full plate thursday @ miz helen's
foodie friday @ rattlebridge farm
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Prunes Poached in Red Wine, or "I like prunes, how about you?", Recipe rewind because some things are too good to miss!

There are many shared traits between my husband Terry and I, but none more delicious than the love of prunes. So with that, I  no we offer you.......

Recipe rewind, because in the beginning there is a blogger who has no readers. She still posts great food in hopes that the readers will come..........you can also view it here in the archives, Saturday May 29, 2010. 

Prunes Poached in Red Wine

Sometimes I think we need to concentrate on the funny foods. Like prunes. Prunes are the laughing stock of food, and such a pity. I read a recipe years ago that tried to address that issue and then went on to give the the recipe a more glamorous name. Dried Plum whatever, instead of Prune whatever. I remember the content was aimed at younger cooks and the goal was to get the cook, cooking with prunes, I mean dried plums.

The nutritionist wrote about the great food value in dried plums; the minerals, the fiber, the great taste, and the convenience.
But.....can't we just say prunes?
And mean prunes?
And know that they are delicious, available in your pantry at all times (unless you forgot them at the store, which would be such a pity) and make for great foods, both sweet and savory?

We can?! OK, great.

Today I am making Prunes Poached in Red Wine, for Sunday Cafe. The recipe states to simmer and serve, but I wanted to make this a day ahead and let the cinnamon sticks add more flavor. I only made one change I used 3 cinnamon sticks, instead of only 2. I used Merlot as the dry red wine, it is what I had open.



Prunes in Red Wine
adapted from Kitchenography

1 pound pitted prunes (about 40)
1 1/4 c sugar
3 cinnamon sticks
2 1/2 c dry red wine



2  8oz containers Mascarpone cheese

Combine in a large covered pan. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to simmer, cover and simmer 45 minutes. Transfer to a dish, cover and chill until serving time.



To serve place a large spoonful of the cheese on a rimmed plate or shallow dish, add prunes and drizzle syrup over.

Serves 8

More than delicious, rich, silky and deeply flavorful. You won't be sorry and you might need to double the recipe next time!

As always, thanks for taking a minute to stop and say hello. We appreciate your time and your wonderful comments!
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Monkey Bread Ring, Recipe rewind because some things are too good to miss!


Recipe rewind, because in the beginning there is a blogger who has no readers. She still posts great food in hopes that the readers will come..........you can also view it here in the archives, Saturday May 7, 2011.



Having Angel Biscuit dough ready to go is very convenient. The bowl sits quietly in the refrigerator, until you have need to use it. Like I said, convenient! For a quick meal last week, we had Easter Ham bone soup and dinner scones.

I make scones, because I am a lazy biscuit baker! The rolling and cutting and re-rolling of the dough, phooey! I prefer to pat the dough out, cut into the number of scones I need/want and bake. Done and done.

To make scones, preheat oven to 425.


Remove dough from refrigerator, score dough into 4 parts. Note:  Each part will be about the same as a tube of dairy case biscuits for those recipes you want to adapt to Angel Biscuit Dough.


Using one part, knead dough 3 - 5 times on a "floured" surface, I use oat bran. It keeps any dough from sticking and does not leave a floury finish. Pat into a circle approximately 1/2 inch thick. Cut into desired number of scones, place circle in a prepared baking pan. Bake 20 - 25 minutes or until done in your oven. Enjoy!

And not lets make Monkey Bread Ring.


Monkey Bread Ring
350 degree oven

1 portion of Angel Biscuit dough - use link above for recipe.

1/2 c brown sugar
1/2 t cinnamon
1/2 t nutmeg

1/4 c melted butter

1/4 c real maple syrup
1/4 c broken pecan pieces

Combine brown sugar with cinnamon and nutmeg, set aside. Using one portion of the Angel Biscuit dough, knead 3-5 times on a "floured" surface. Flatten to a rectangle. and cut into 24 pieces.



  




Roll each portion of dough into a ball, coat in melted butter, roll in brown sugar mixture and arrange in baking pan.

 It is safe to use a jelly jar for the center support, just remember it will get very hot in the oven.


When all dough has been used, scatter pecans over top of dough balls, pour maple syrup over and finally use up the butter and the brown sugar mixture by scattering over the top of the dough balls. Bake 25 minutes.


Remove from oven, cool 5 - 10 minutes, carefully remove jelly jar from center and set aside to cool (do not place in a sink of water, it will break, please do not ask me how I know this!) the jar is very hot.

As always thanks for taking a minute to stop and say hello. We appreciate your time and your wonderful comments!
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Stacked Cheese Biscuits, Recipe rewind because some things are too good to miss!


Recipe rewind, because in the beginning there is a blogger who has no readers. She still posts great food in hopes that the readers will come..........you can also view it here in the archives, Monday, May 9, 2011.

For the starting recipe of Angel Biscuit Dough, you can look here


Stacked Cheese Biscuits, say cheese please!
I hope you are not tired of learning about Angel Biscuit dough and what you can make with it, because we are having some tonight with our dinner. Tonight it is, Cheese Leaves Muffins. They are in the oven right now, so I better get busy typing this up!


Stacked Cheese Biscuits
375 degree oven
makes 6, large muffin cup biscuits

1 portion Angel Biscuit dough, for the dough recipe click here and for more recipes click here!
butter
garlic salt
grated cheese
flour or oat bran for rolling out dough

Using 1 portion of dough, roll out to a large rectangle.

This photo will demonstrate size needed. 


Butter lightly, sprinkle with garlic salt, divide lengthwise into 4 portions.


Sprinkle one portion with cheese, carefully place a section on top. Sprinkle cheese on the new one on top, continuing until all 4 pieces have been stacked. 

Divide into 6 pieces, place in prepared muffin cups, standing up.



Bake 20 minutes or until done in your oven.

The fourth portion will go into the freezer, for now.

As always, thanks for taking a minute to stop and say hello. We appreciate your time and your wonderful comments!



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Angel Biscuit Dough, Recipe rewind because some things are too good to miss!


Recipe rewind, because in the beginning there is a blogger who has no readers. She still posts great food in hopes that the readers will come..........you can also view it here in the archives, Sunday May 1, 2011.


You know you have a good cookbook when it is no longer pretty, most likely has a food drip/stain on the jacket cover and probably has handwritten notes on how you want to make a recipe again. That is this book.

I call a book like this beautiful, because it is used and appreciated. Tattooed if you will, with the living of life in a busy kitchen, while helping to feed the family and friends that drop by.



This book contains some great recipes including our favorite Banana Bread. 









Angel Biscuits came before dairy case biscuit dough in a tube. These biscuits are baked from a dough made up ahead of time and stored in the refrigerator. Just like tube biscuits, only homemade, with your choice of ingredients. Think "Monkey Bread", quick dough pizza, biscuit topping for pot pie or fruit cobbler. And my favorite, Stacked Cheese Biscuits.
If a recipe calls for tubes of biscuit dough, you can make it with Angel Biscuit dough. 
The finished dough can be stored for up to 7 days, and frozen for up to 1 month.

Angel Biscuit Dough
adapted/made from: The Wooden Spoon Bread Book

the intro:  Angel Biscuits are a Southern Specialty. The dough, risen by both yeast and quick leaveners, produces a very light biscuit. The mixing can be done ahead of of the baking to suit your schedule. 

To soften yeast, in a small container combine,


3 T warm water
1 scant T (or 1 packet) active dry yeast


let yeast stand while preparing the dry ingredients. In a large bowl, whisk together:

5 c unbleached flour
1 T baking powder
1 t baking soda
1 1/2 t salt
1/4 c sugar
It worked very well, to whisk together in the mixer bowl,

and then to cut the butter into small pieces, drop it into the flour mixture, one piece at a time. Process on low until the butter has been worked into the flour mixture. 
OR

with a pastry blender or two knives, cut into the dry ingredients,

1 c butter or shortening of choice

make a well in the center of the dry ingredients. Into that well pour the,

softened yeast
2 C buttermilk

Gently mix with a wooden spoon just until dry ingredients are moistened. Just a few turns of the paddle mixer did the trick.


Dough will be soft. Scrape down sides of bowl.




 
Cover with waxed paper and then a china plate.
 
Chill for at least 1 hour or longer.



When ready to bake remove enough dough to make desired numbered biscuits. On a lightly floured surface, knead gently two or three times. Roll to 1/2 inch thickness. Cut as desired and bake in preheated 400 degree oven, 12 - 15 minutes or until golden brown. Serve warm.

To substitute this dough for tube biscuits in your favorite recipes, divide the dough into 4 parts. Each part will be equal to a tube of biscuit dough.

Now that you have dough, what will you make with it? I do believe I smell some Monkey Bread and Stacked Cheese Biscuits in our future, stay tuned!

As always, thanks for taking a minute to stop and say hello. We appreciate your time and your wonderful comments!
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Laurie Colwin's Pot Roast, Recipe rewind, because some things are too good to miss!


Recipe rewind, because in the beginning there is a blogger who has no readers. She still posts great food in hopes that the readers will come..........you can also view it here in the archives,  Monday September 27, 2010.

This original post is from the old house, but the message and recipe are time worthy, I hope you enjoy.


Right now the house is cool, but not cold. I don't think this house is ever been cold. It is small and very well insulated. We have been without heat since mid February, by choice. Vancouver had a cold winter, when our firewood ran out, we decided that we would not purchase another cord. A cord of wood, would of been more than we needed and unusable once the new pellet stove was installed, so we simply put on a sweater if we got cold. There was a surprising benefit to that decision. I found that having a chill in the air, was a wonderful time to understand warmth. 

Warmth is very soothing, to the body as well as the soul. Fortunately, warmth is in ample supply and can be found in just about every area of your life.You can find warmth in the work you do, or in the comfort of your home and surroundings, and with the ones you love or spend the most time with. But finding warmth is a task of happiness, as much as comfort, provided to a cold and tired body.


As it turns out, warmth is also a complement or a good thought. Friends and family are often described as having a “warm heart”. When something tickles your senses or funny bone it is often described as a “warm and fuzzy” feeling. And of course my personal favorite “cold hands, warm heart” offered as a compliment, when a handshake surprises the one with the warmer hands! I am pretty sure that one is my favorite, because I usually have very chilly hands.

Another place I find warmth is in a story or book. When I read, I find myself comfortable and cozy, well wrapped up in the story. There must be a break in the universal clock when I read, because time does not tick away, chores do not beckon and sleep will not come. Which is why I do not read in bed, I would never ever get to sleep!

I have just finished reading; HOME COOKING, a writer in the kitchen by Laurie Colwin. It is a bittersweet read, she was so engaged in life and in living her life. Warm is the perfect word to describe her. As I read how she managed life, and loved her family, I am touched deeply and wish for more, much more. 

Laurie was also a great cook and eater. I get the impression that everyone was well fed and loved in her New York kitchen. This quote is about her pot roast, she says: "This meal, which takes some time to prepare, must be eaten slowly. Afterwards it is best to stretch out on the sofa, with a cup of coffee balanced on your stomach". You know, I think friends share those thoughts and talk to each other like that, don't you?
  
Laurie Colwin's Pot Roast
Adapted from:  HOME COOKING a writer in the kitchen
300 degree oven                 

5 pound chuck roast
paprika
olive oil
3 red bell peppers, sliced
2 yellow onions, cut into chunks
1 carrot, peeled and sliced 1 inch thick
6 cloves garlic
1 8 oz can tomato sauce
1 glass red wine
salt and pepper to taste

Tie a string around the outside of the roast to keep it stable. Sprinkle well with paprika.


In a large skillet, sear the meat, turning to brown all sides. Place the roast into a Dutch oven.

In the same skillet, add the peppers and saute in olive oil. Spoon over meat in the dutch oven.

My little corner market was out of red peppers, I picked out the ripest of the green peppers. I also decided to saute all the vegetables including the garlic.

Add the wine and tomato sauce to the skillet, and simmer to cook down slightly, pour over roast.



Season with salt and pepper to preference, then cover.  Cook 3 – 5 hours. When the meat is tender, carefully remove from dutch oven and place on platter, covered loosely with foil or a clean tea towel.

 This is the color of the rich pan stock, this will be reduced and served over slices of the roast.

Remove the vegetables with a slotted spoon,  push through a sieve or food mill. Do Not Use a Blender. The end result is to remove any fibers and seeds from the puree.


Add the pureed vegetables to the meat broth and simmer to reduce and thicken slightly.

I choose to thicken the sauce with a bit of golden browned flour* I keep in the refrigerator. It was just the right touch to thicken and give the consistency needed for serving over mashed potatoes.

Slice meat and spoon some of the gravy over, serve remaining in a gravy boat to pass at the table.


This is simply delicious! I hope you enjoy this roast as much as we did, and if you should need anything, you will find me on the couch, practicing with my coffee cup.

* to make golden brown flour, place 2 cups (or so) flour in a skillet. Over low heat, stirring constantly, "cook" until flour is a rich golden brown. Let cool, keep refrigerated. This flour used in gravies instead of plain flour adds a rich golden nutty flavor.

As always, thanks for taking a minute to stop and say hello. We appreciate your time and your wonderful comments!

this post is shared with:
weekend cooking @ beth fish reads
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